Posts Tagged ‘bead patterns

14
Aug
12

Blast from the past- 1st installment BPCanes

It is way too hot to take pictures. I was thinking that some of my content in the beginning of my blogging adventure was pretty cool, so sort of like summer re-runs on TV, I am going to re-post some of these babies that I really like.

Silence on a radio, no picture and sound on a TV, and no words on a blog are always a little disconcerting.

May your summer be cool.

May your drinks be cooler,

and may your heart be content.

Blessings all over all ya all!!

Just a note: Bead Space is no longer a viable link, but bead patterns are readily available all over the web!

Click on the title header below to take you to the full blog post!!

Extruder Canes with Bead Patterns as a guide

I put up the color mixing chart yesterday for this project!

Millefiori is the glass technique of bundling or layering colored rods of glass together to form images and then cutting the cross section of the bundled or layered glass to get a little tile of an image. These colored rods of glass are called canes. I have seen this technique duplicated in many mediums, ceramic, candy, food, and polymer clay, and it can sometimes seem almost impossible to achieve, but if you start with basic design, bulls eye canes, open spirals and checkerboards just to name a few, you can combine those to make more intricate pictures or images, called advanced caning. Anytime two or more simple patterns are combined it becomes advanced. I have found a way to make intricate canes that is so easy to do, yet gives the impression of intricacy and complication. Bead patterns and a Makin’s Clay extruder are great for attempting this.
01
Apr
11

African Trade Beads -part 8

This is a series of African trade bead primary patterns, this is part 8,

you can see part 1 here,

you can see part 2 here,

you can see part 3 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-3.html

you can see part 4 here,

 

you can see part 5 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-5.html

you can see part 6 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-6.html

you can see part 7 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-7-continued.html

As I said this is one of my favorites.

I hope you all have a wonderful weekend.

If you are feeling stressed smile and breathe.

You will need:

Poppy Red Cernit 900-428

Terra Cotta Cernit 900-839

Opaque White Cernit 900-027

Green Cernit 900-600

Caramel Cernit 900-807

Yellow Cernit 900-700

Porcelain White 905-010– 1.1 pound package

Clay Blade-SB

Makin’s Clay Extruder and triangle disk that comes with it

Extruder disk set 1 triangle

Makin’s Clay Machine

double ended knitting needle

ruler

Links for products will lead to my Hubby’s store http://www.clayfactory.net/

 

Thank you for shopping at the Clay Factory, not just a clay store anymore.;-D

I mixed Opaque White and the Yellow with equal amounts of the porcelain white.

I mixed a half block of Poppy Red and Caramel together and then with an equal amount of Porcelain White to make the Brick Red color.

I mixed a 1/3 of a block of the Green with 3 times the amount of Porcelain white.

Roll out a coil of Yellow that is 3″ long.

Make the coil 5/8″ in diameter.

Roll out a sheet of the Poppy red and Terra Cotta mix. Cut the leading edge at an angle with your blade and trim the sides for straight edges.

Roll the yellow coil back to pick up the edge.

Roll the yellow coil up in the sheet of the Brick red color and roll over on the opposite side of the brick-red sheet. Make the mark with the leading edge cut gently and roll back. Cut just inside the line that you have made with your blade and make it the opposite angle from the leading edge cut. Roll the coil up , match the edges and close the seam. Roll on the work surface a little.

Load up the barrel of the clay extruder using the triangle shown It is the one that comes in disk set 1.

Extrude a full barrel of clay.

Cut the Triangles to the length of your center coil.

Place them on the outside of the coil leaving about 1/8″ separating each one. 

I fit 9 of them around the outside of the center. You might want to stand the center on one of its ends while you do this so you do not distort the triangles.

Roll out a sheet of the opaque white mix on the thickest setting in the clay machine. Trim the leading edge so it is straight and make the sides of the sheet the width of the center.

Wrap up the center gently in the white sheet and tuck in one end of the white sheet in to the gap between two of the triangles with the knitting needle. You will need to be very gently with this process so as not to destroy your points on your triangles. Cradle the center in your hands when you have to hold it. Your patience and attention to detail will be worth it. Tuck the other end in to the area of the first end you tucked in.

Gently now, indent the areas between the triangles with your finger all the way around. Then you will take the knitting needle and lay it in the indents and push a little. Do this all the way around the center wrapped in white. We are going to indent deeper and deeper all the way around a little at a time.

Keep indenting gently.

Like this.

 

Load up the barrel of the clay extruder with the green mix. Use the flattened triangle that comes with the clay extruder.

Extrude the full barrel.

Cut the extruded triangles to the length of the center.

Lay the triangle point first in to the dips in the white you made with the knitting needle. Roll this gently on the work surface after you have placed all of the green triangles.

Choke the cane in the dip between the thumb and the forefinger and squeeze a waist in the cane. Turning a little and squeezing. Moving up from the middle.

Turn the cane over and start again twisting and squeezing.

Squeeze like this.

Roll the cane after you have reduced it to half the size.

Start with your hands in the middle and roll them and the cane forward with smoothness from the fingertips to the back of the palm of your hand. The roll smoothly back to your fingertips again. At the same time you are moving your hands away from each other, not fast but slowly and smoothly. Once you get to the out sides of the cane pick you hands up and start in the middle again. Pretend I have two hands in the picture.

Use the clay slicing blade and push the blade forward as you roll the cane forward to cut the cane.

Tah Dah!!!

31
Mar
11

African Trade Beads- part 7 continued from part 6

This is a series of African trade bead primary patterns, this is part 7, which is also the continuation from part 6

you can see part 1 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-1.html

you can see part 2 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-2.html

you can see part 3 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-3.html

you can see part 4 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-4.html

you can see part 5 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-5.html

you can see part 6 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-6.html

As always click on pictures to make them larger.

You will need:

Flower canes already made

and the one made in part 3 http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-3.html

Clay Blade- SB

Bamboo Skewer- 2mm

Ruler (if you wish)

Needle Tool- PRO

1/2″ heart cutter-APC1H

5/8″ round cutter-APCAR

Links for products will lead to my Hubby’s store http://www.clayfactory.net/ 

 

Thank you for shopping at the Clay Factory, not just a clay store anymore.;-D

  

  

Cut a 1/4″ slice from the block that you made in part 6.

Press the clay slice gently to your work surface.

Start in the corner of one side, the side you want to start at is up to you.

Cut out a heart with the 1/2″ cutter.

Cut firmly to the work surface and pull back quickly the heart should stay in the sheet but be cut out.

Turn the cutter around and cut the next heart out and pull back quickly.

Cut out the whole sheet of hearts, as many as you can get out of it.

I got 5 out of this sheet.

There are the hearts. A couple stuck in the cutter and I took the cutter and placed the heart on a fresh piece of clay (I used the block I made, it is best to condition a fresh piece of clay and use that instead) and pulled back quickly and it pulled the heart out of the cutter a little.

You can also dip the cutter in water and then cut and it will come free. Do the water dip each time you cut one heart out.

Use the needle tool and drill the needle in to the top of the heart to poke the hole through to the bottom.

When the tip comes out the bottom drill the needle back out.

Turn the heart over and drill the needle in to the bottom hole you made with the needle.

Next:

You will need:

A little section of the original cane from part 3

You will need it to be 3/4″ in diameter.

5/8″ cutter

scrap clay from block you made in part 6

Slice off two thin slices.

Roll out your scrap clay on the thickest setting in your pasta machine. Cut out two rounds.

Roll them together into one ball.

Flatten out the slices a little with your thumb and forefinger.

Cover half of the ball with one slice.

Start on one side of the ball and match the other slice to the one you already added.

Pull the slice over to the other side and push it to match the slice that is already there.

Sometimes the slice will not match so I push the scrap clay in with my finger nail and push the edges of the slices together over it.

Once the edges are together, roll the ball gently at first and make it as round as you can.

“Drill” into the bead with the point of the skewer. I hold the bead in my hand.

Rotate the skewer and move in to the bead. 

You will see the bead start to bulge out on the other side, keep drilling until the point goes through barely.

Drill the skewer back out.

Turn the bead over and drill in to the hole on the coming out side, it will even out the hole on that side.

Drill the skewer back out.

Bake on a piece of corrugated cardboard box top and bake the bead sitting on the hole.

If you bake the bead sitting on the hole so that if there is a flat spot from settling while baking it will have another bead there when strung and will not be seen.

The next cane is fun. Coming in part 8!!

Have a great weekend everyone.

Love and huge hugs.

30
Mar
11

African Trade Beads- part 6

This is a series of African trade bead primary patterns, this is part 6,

you can see part 1 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-1.html

you can see part 2 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-2.html

you can see part 3 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-3.html

you can see part 4 here,

http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-4.html

you can see part 5 here,

 

Well, I am going to post this on a wednesday even though it is saved for Wonders. I do not feel bad doing this because it is a wonder I am still moving through this series.  I have taken and edited 100’s of pictures, given a lot of techniques, and I find, I am still scratching the surface here, so I continue.

As always click on pictures to make them larger.

You will need:

Flower canes already made

the one made in part 5 http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-5.html

and the one made in part 3 http://mariesegal.blogspot.com/2011/03/african-trade-beads-part-3.html

Clay Blade– SB

Bamboo Skewer- 2mm

Ruler (if you wish)

Needle Tool– PRO

Links for products will lead to my Hubby’s store http://www.clayfactory.net/  

 

Thank you for shopping at the Clay Factory, not just a clay store anymore.;-D


Roll the cane from part 5 down to a little less than 3/8″.

Cut the cane piece in to 3/8″ pieces or as long as the are in diameter.

You can use the ruler to cut your beads or you can use the first cut bead to measure the others you cut.

Roll the bead gently with your finger and thumb to take off the high spots and round the bead.

Once you get it pretty round you can roll it faster in your palms.

Once the bead is round you can pierce the bead by drilling through one side with the needle tool.

You can see the needle starting to push out the bead on the opposite side.

Drill out the needle tool.

Turn the bead over to the opposite side and drill the needle tool in to the hole to even out the shape of the bead and round both holes out.

Even on both sides. Tah-dah!

Bake on a piece of corrugated cardboard box top and bake the bead sitting on the hole.

If you bake the bead sitting on the hole so that if there is a flat spot from settling while baking it will have another bead there when strung and will not be seen.

Next:

We are going to make a block of cane rods that can be used for making beads or for rolling out canes sheets for covering items.

You will need the cane from part 3

Roll it down to 3/8″ or a little under.

Cut the cane rods 2 1/4″ long.

Place 3 together.

Cut 3 more and stack them in the dips of the others.

Cut 3 more and stack in those dips.

This is them standing on the end of the canes.

Cut these in half.

Move the front half in to the left side. It will fit right in there like it was made to go there.

Like this.

I did not feel the cane was going to be long enough so I added another cane to the bottom right side continuing the pattern.

One to the middle and one to the top.

Stand the block on one of the ends.

Slide the blade down the outside of the top cane and the bottom one cutting the middle one in half. It will probably stick to your blade.

Move the cane half to the left side to make the straight sides.

The cane ends now become what I call the face of the block.

Lay it on the sides and compact the top and bottom of the block, not the face of the block, with the thumb mound of your palm.

Turn the block on the sides of the block and compact the canes together.

The first cut should just even the face and take off some of the bulging cane face.

Take another slice that is about 3/16″.

With your blade at an angle bevel one edge.

Then bevel the opposite edge.

The slice will look like this.

Lay your skewer in to the middle of this slice down the length.

Pull up the outside edges around the skewer.

Match the edges and close them around the skewer.

Push the edges down and press gently together.

Roll on the work surface to smooth the seam together all the way.

Grasp the whole length of the tube bead with your hand and break it loose from the skewer by twisting the whole thing gently.

It may even be out of shape or lumpy.

Roll again on your work surface to even it out.

Roll the blade and the skewer forward to trim the end of the bead off for a straight edge or end.

With the blade laying flat on the surface to measure your next bead length.

I have the sharp edge on the left side of the blade.

Rock the sharp edge up and roll the skewer and the blade forward to make the next cut. Always hold the blade straight up and down.

I cut as many beads (3/4″) as I can this way.

If I have a small section of bead left I cut small spacer beads.

Usually about 1/8″ to 3/16″ long.

By pressing gently on the bead (3/16″) with my thumb and forefinger I can bulge the sides out a little.

By taking one of the 3/4″ tubes I can make a nice barrel bead by pressing with my thumb and forefinger evenly in the middle slowly.

Here are the beads so far. I am stopping here.

I will continue with the rest of the beads in the next part.

Probably Thursday.

Ta ta for now!




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